YOUR ATTENTION PLEASE. IGNORE THIS MESSAGE!

In the public square scattered cell phone “bell” alerts dot the city soundscape ringing from pockets, bags and café tables. This image shows an iphone with alerts set to bells.

Title:

Your Attention Please! Ignore this Message

When and Where:

Exhibited as part of Break It! Build It! at the Burlington City Arts Gallery, July 25, 2014 – September 13, 2014

Ideas:

This installation is inspired by an earlier work, the Firehouse Bell Project.

Despite major shifts in technology, bells continue to serve as cultural signifiers in the public square. A bell like the one atop this firehouse remains part of the built environment even though it no longer rings. Next door at City Hall a bell recording plays on the hour through an amplifier, no physical bell required. Scattered cell phone “bell” alerts dot the city soundscape ringing from pockets, bags and café tables.

Within the lifetime of current Burlington residents, civic bells like the Firehouse Bell communicated singular messages that found meaning in community, time and place.
By contrast in 2014 bells and alerts from personalized media sustain a persistent sonic layer of anytime–anyplace messages. While these messages are not meant for us they demand our attention.

Your Attention Please! Ignore this Message explores the cultural shift from public bells to private bells through Malcolm McCullough’s definition of the Ambient Commons. It is a reflection on how (and perhaps increasingly so) our sensory field comes from and refers to someplace else.

Installation Experience:

Ubiquitous cell phone alerts that reference bells were amplified in the gallery through ceiling speakers. Private alerts based on an individual’s schedule were played publicly. The installation Your Attention Please! Ignore this Message brings attention to the continued sounding of bells in the public square, despite major shifts in what we consider public and private and the blurring lines between the common digital and physical spaces we share.

Listen

Cell Phone Bells:  This short clip includes “chimes”, “bell”, “bell tower”, and “door bell”.

SOUND AND COLOR: EXPLORING TIME AND PLACE ON THE LAKE CHAMPLAIN WATERFRONT

Champlain Sound and Color - Burlington VT - Paris
Champlain Sound and Color. Pictured here is the color stream projected at La Bellevilloise gallery in Paris, France. The stream was live from the ECHO Center in Burlington VT.

Title:

SOUND AND COLOR: EXPLORING TIME AND PLACE ON THE LAKE CHAMPLAIN WATERFRONT

Artists: Jenn Karson, Matt Larson

When and Where

In April 2010 CiTu labs of the University of Paris held the first synchronized international event for The Art Collider. In Vermont, sound artist Jenn Karson and photographer Matt Larson participated from ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center in Burlington, Vermont. They contributed live sound and video streams from the Burlington Waterfront using max/MSP.

The Art Collider is an online platform that supports a collaborative creation of media art through a system of Peer-to-Peer and Artist-to-Artist production.

Sites in the Paris, Montreal, San Francisco, New York & Linz participated in the event.

Idea:

Lake Champlain is a place of global history and natural beauty. Its cultural communities have included
the native Abnaki, early French & British settlers. Presently Burlington is a place of
Asian and African refugee resettlement programs. Traffic from Burlington’s international airport is a dominant element of the Lake’s soundscape. Accompanying its cultural communities are its natural communities. Spring in Vermont is always a dynamic season, a combination of snowfall and snow melt, mud and ice, rain, sleet, sun and frost. It is a time when people and the animals who made their way south for the winter, return. Currently, the weather in the area is more turbulent than usual as the northeast region of the United States is experiencing record flooding and temperatures.

Sound and Color: Exploring Time and Place on the Lake Champlain Waterfront is an exploration of
these natures and cultures that are the Lake Champlain Waterfront.

The Streams

Champlain Sound Stream

NAVIGATING THE BAY

Projection from NAVIGATING THE BAY. This was an active score that responded to active triggers (sensors) in the courtyard.

Title:

NAVIGTING THE BAY

When and Where:

San Francisco Art institute Courtyard
December 2008

Score/drawing used in the projection of the installation NAVIGATING THE BAY.

Ideas:

Navigating the Bay is a sound and projection installation that explores the complex systems of humans, animals and machines that rely and reside on the San Francisco Bay. A response to the  2007 Cosco Busan Oil Spill that was partly the fault of malfunctioning radar, the installation uses sound, projection, sensors, micro controllers and Max/MSP. The piece explores the progression of navigational technologies,  channeling current sounds of the bay through historic San Francisco fog horn patterns.

Listen

SunTracker 2012: A New Sound Installation in Progress

Sound installation: Sun TrackerI’m currently working on a new installation “Sun Tracker” that will debut on Friday, June 22, 2012 as part of the Woodstock Digital Media Festival. Working with Jeff Branson of Denver, CO and Sam Stelfox of Burlington, a sound installation will be programmed based on the Earth/Sun relationship during the time of the summer solstice. We are using Cosm (previously known as Pachube) to keep track of the live feeds (from Colorado, Vermont and possibly California).

I met Jeff and Sam through Vermont Makers, and it’s been great to work with them. Jeff works with SparkFun out in Denver and Sam is a part of Lab B in Burlington. Along with Studio Ju Ju, Lab B has  served as a workspace for this project, in fact we met there last week with Jeff (via google+ hangout).

I’ll document the project here as we move forward. In the meantime here’s a link to more Studio Ju Ju sound installations.

 

Champlain Sound and Color (Paris)

Champlain color stream as it appeared in Paris at La Bellevilloise as it was being broadcast from ECHO Lake and Science Aquarium in Burlington, VT.

In April 2010 CiTu labs of the University of Paris held the first synchronized international event for The Art Collider. In Vermont, sound artist Jenn Karson and photographer Matt Larson participated from ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center in Burlington, Vermont. They contributed live sound and video streams from the Burlington Waterfront using max/MSP programming.

The Art Collider is an online platform that supports a collaborative creation of media art through a system of Peer-to-Peer and Artist-to-Artist production.

Sites in the Paris, Montreal, San Francisco, New York & Linz participated in the event.

Sound & Color wiki

Champlain Color Stream

Champlain Sound Stream

Comment on the Champlain Streams