RELEASED.

An office intercom still works, its switches clearly labeled North Corr., Bubble Office, Dining Room, Kitchen, Ground Activity, etc. We flick its switches and listen to the rooms, each one echoes a unique memory and its own sound, each room sounding a distinctive blend of overtones and textures. The slow damp decay of the building’s structure holds all this. This sound piece begins to imagine the release.

Title:

RELEASED.

When and Where:

A sound installation at:

GOING TO WATERBURY: AN ELEGY
Art Installation and Closure Ceremony

Saturday, October 27, 2012
Sunday, October 28, 2012

Photographs of the hospital that were included in the exhibition 

Read more in this VT Digger article 

Ideas:

This sound composition is created from recordings made in Dale and Brooks on October 19, 2012 – just over a year after the hospital was evacuated due to floodwater damage from Tropical Storm Irene. The Vermont State Hospital was officially closed on October 20, 2011.

The building’s mechanics dominate its inner soundscape with churning, humming and buzzing that echoes in its empty hallways and rooms. Outside and heard through open windows, the area is circled by sounds of traffic, birds, the Vermonter train and the river. On this day it is raining.

An office intercom still works, its switches clearly labeled North Corr., Bubble Office, Dining Room, Kitchen, Ground Activity, etc. We flick its switches and listen to the rooms, each one echoes a unique memory and its own sound, each room sounding a distinctive blend of overtones and textures. The slow damp decay of the building’s structure holds all this. This sound piece begins to imagine the release.

Lighting by Jeffrey Salzberg

Thank you to Tom Stevens and Kevin Rogers.

Background:

The Vermont State Hospital in its early days.

Construction for the Vermont State Asylum for the Insane began in 1891. It was expanded and modernized through the early 1960s. 1963 – 2011 is considered a period of deinstitutionalization for the campus.  The hospital was evacuated due to floodwater damage from Tropical Storm Irene in the fall of 2011. For more information about the history of Asylums in the U.S and around the world: www.asylumprojects.org

Read more in this VT Digger article 

Installation Experience:

The Installation RELEASED is projected through two sets of speakers, one set is inside the blue room listening area, the other set outside and directed toward the open sky. As you listen to the composition in the contained space of the blue room, at the same time it is released out into the open air.

Listen

Listen to RELEASED.

Released. Waterbury, Vermont 2012
Looking into the blue-lit room from outside the hospital. The installation sounded inside the blue room and was also “released” into the open air from speakers on the roof of the building.

Explore the Possibilities of Exhibiting and Reading Radio and Sound art

This is really interesting and much needed exploration of sound art and sound art exhibition. The exhibition description says it explores “all” the possible ways of exhibiting and reading sound art – quite the overstatement!  I think there will always be new ways to exhibit and understand sound art. In any case, great to see people out there ready to take the journey.

Radio Arts Space FM / online / gallery exhibition / sound arts
Radio Arts Space FM / online / gallery exhibition

The exhibition Radio Arts Space constructs a gallery inside radio space, where Sound art and Radio art works are exhibited. It explores (many possible ways) of exhibiting and reading Radio and Sound art. The project is also complemented by an (international) platform for the discussion of meanings, contextualization, artistic research and the exchange of sound art works.

radioCona, produced by CONA, launched in 2008, is a platform that uses the radio frequency space in art contexts. FM frequency is understood as public space, explored from different perspectives and mediated through artworks audiobooks, programming and exhibitions. radioCona is intervention into public space.

Today’s Sonic Ju Ju comes from Bruce Nauman’s “Days” at the MOMA

Here it is today’s Sonic Ju Ju – Click to listen

“A recent addition to the Museum’s collection, Bruce Nauman’s Days (2009) was created for, and debuted at, the 2009 Venice Biennale, where the artist represented the United States with the solo exhibition Bruce Nauman: Topological Gardens. Days is a “sound sculpture” consisting of a continuous stream of seven voices reciting the days of the week in random order. Fourteen suspended speakers are installed in two rows with one voice emanating from each pair of speakers as the visitor passes between them. There are men’s voices and women’s voices, old and young. Some speak swiftly, others with pause, each with his or her own cadence. The collection of distinctive voices produces a chorus—at times cacophonous, at others, resonant—and creates a sonic cocoon that envelops the visitor. The work invokes both the banality and the profundity of the passing of each day, and invites reflection on how we measure, differentiate, and commemorate time.”

Recording by Jenn Karson, August 16, 2010.
Photo and text are from the MOMA’s Website.

Click here for the complete article from the MOMA Website

Navigating the Bay (San Francisco)

Navigating the Bay, 2008.
San Francisco Art Institute Courtyard

This interactive sound & projection installation was built using Max/MSP, microcontrollers and a series of motion, temperature and humidity sensors.

The piece explores the complex system of machines, elements, animals, humans and money that inhabit the San Francisco Bay.