Presenting at Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES) 2017

Join us for this year’s symposium – three days of presentations and performances not to be missed! Studio Ju Ju will present on our work with Sub Ambient Sound Lab.


Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES) 2017

Registration now open
August 9, 2017 to August 12, 2017
Distillery District, downtown Toronto, ON

https://naisa.ca/ties-registration/

New Adventures in Sound Art (NAISA), the Canadian Electroacoustic Community (CEC) and the Canadian Music Centre (CMC) are pleased to announce the 11th edition of the Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES), and delighted to welcome Québec sound artist Chantal Dumas as Keynote Speaker for TIES 2017. Dumas is a highly respected sound artist who explores the medium of sound through the production of audio fiction and docufiction, sound installation, composition and sound design. The symposium will take place in Toronto from 9-12 August 2017 in Toronto’s Distillery District.

TIES includes papers, lecture-recitals and several concert works curated by an international jury. It is an annual opportunity for exchange between diverse EA communities.

Do You Need a Sound Detector?

Here’s a nice option for art installations and sound projects that need to detect sound and/or measure sound amplitude.

The SparkFun Sound Detector is a small and relatively easy to use audio sensing board with three different outputs. The Sound Detector not only provides an audio output, but also a binary indication of the presence of sound, and an analog representation of its amplitude. The 3 outputs are simultaneous and independent, so you can use as many or as few as you want at once.

This first demo that includes and arduino and the sound detector board, starts with simple “claps” in order to demonstrate the binary indication of sound. Note that that the LED changes color and an indication light goes on and off on the sound detector board.

The next demo uses a horn sound, the horn sound is more complex and an anolog representation of the sound is shown through the changing colors of the idea. As the amplitude of the sound changes so does the color.

The third demo creates feedback using the sound detectors audio out and generating feedback with the use of the mini amp.

Arduino + Sound Detector tutorial

Product info here

True Experience + Time Warp Impossible Journey

This composition demonstrates how physical boundaries are easily broken and betrayed by sound’s ability to transcend consecutive time and solid structures, refracting time and space.

The journey begins on NYC subway platform where the particulate rhythms and melodies of the subway swarm with the notes and beats of subway musicians.*  Once boarded and on the train, the ambient is quieted and encapsulated…until you are let off, far from the city, where the barren trees hold steady, absorbing a cold winter rain.

*Mecca Bodega

Suggestions for creating the best listening environment for this composition:

Many of the composition’s sonic textures will be lost if played through the tiny tinny speaker your computer or mobile device. The best way to listen is through headphones. It can be a challenge to capture the spatial qualities of a sound piece like this one through the rigid environment of computer and and mobile screens. I’d rather play it for you in a gallery space or even through your own sound system in your home, an environment that would allow the sound to travel through a quality speaker, then through space before arriving in your ears.

 

Prototyping for Sound: Arduino MP3 Player Shield

I’m experimenting with a Sparkfun mp3 player shield for Arduino, using it to prototype for a sound installation idea. In this prototype there are just simple push buttons, while the final installation is more likely to use sensing or more complex triggers. This prototype allows me to experiment with different sounds and on a small scale, get a sense of how sound transitions might work. For the speaker I’m using my old faithful Fender mini amp, love this little device! I use it routinely for prototyping. The video here demonstrates a setup of simple push button that trigger custom sounds stored on the sd card.

There are tutorials and libraries on the Sparkfun site and Github. I used this tutorial to get started.

Want to learn more about Arduino shields?

 

Staring Back: The Creation and Legacy of Picasso’s Demoiselles D’Avignon



Title:

Jenn Karson is a project collaborator on this exhibition and created two sound installations for it. Learn more in the exhibition catalog:

Staring Back:  The Creation and Legacy of Picasso’s Demoiselles d’Avignon
February 3 – June 21, 2015
Fleming Museum Burlington, Vermont

Opening Reception
Hosted by UVM President Thomas Sullivan,
Fleming Director Janie Cohen, and the Fleming Museum’s Board of Directors
Cash bar, hors d’oeuvres and music
Tuesday February 10, 5:30-7:00 PM

Ideas:

Picasso’s major 1907 painting, Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, created an uproar in the Paris art world and laid the foundation for the development of Cubism. This spring, the Fleming Museum presents an exhibition that explores Picasso’s extraordinary process in creating the painting, through innovative installations and advanced technologies that transform the museum experience. The painting’s ongoing legacy is examined through the work of a diverse group of American, African, and European contemporary artists. While Demoiselles does not travel from its home in the Museum of Modern Art, it will be represented at the Fleming in an unprecedented manner.

Visitors will be introduced to the painting in an environment that evokes Picasso’s studio at the “Bateau Lavoir,” where he first showed Demoiselles to his close friends and colleagues in 1907; their reactions may be heard against a background of ambient sounds that would have echoed through the streets of Montmartre at the time. Augmented reality will enable visitors to view images of Picasso’s studies for the individual figures and the full composition in the context of the painting, and to understand its evolution.

Picasso found inspiration for Demoiselles in art history and contemporary visual culture. Through a variety of new visual technologies, visitors will understand how he synthesized and transformed these diverse sources – from Iberian, African, Oceanic, and Egyptian art to Baroque painting, Cezanne’s and Gauguin’s work, and colonial photographers’ images of African women – to launch a radically new artistic vocabulary.

The largest section of the exhibition highlights the continuing pull of the painting – over 100 years after its creation – as evidenced in the work of international artists, including Leonce Raphael Agbodjelou, Gerri Davis, Damian Elwes, Julian Friedler, Kathleen Gilje, Carlo Maria Mariani, Sophie Matisse, Stas Orlovski, and Jackson Tupper.

STARING BACK was conceived and curated by Janie Cohen, Director of the Fleming Museum of Art. The exhibition is informed by the work of numerous Picasso scholars, including Cohen, who has published on Picasso for over thirty years and whose new research on anthropometric-style colonial African photography and Demoiselles will be published in the journal Photography and Culture in March, 2015. Cohen’s project collaborators are Coberlin Brownell, Assistant Professor, Emergent Media Program at Champlain College, Burlington, Vermont; and Jenn Karson, Sound Artist; Lecturer, UVM College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences; and Founder, Vermont Makers, Burlington, Vermont.

Generous support for this exhibition has been provided by the Kalkin Family Exhibitions Endowment Fund; the Walter Cerf Exhibitions Fund; Rolf Kielman and Stephanie Spencer; TruexCullins Architecture and Interior Design; Kimberley Adams, M.D., and Mark Depman, M.D.; Neil and Ursula Owre Masterson ’89; the Offices of the President and the Provost at the University of Vermont; and the Fleming Contemporary Art Fund.